Onam Sadya and Lessons for Teachers

Yesterday I was invited by my students to take part in their ‘Onam Sadya’ Lunch Celebration. When I landed up there, I found a large number of the students were in ‘mundu’ and ‘kasavu set saree’ (traditional Kerala wear). Most of them stopped to say ‘hi’. welcomes me (and so many others) with a warm smile, and ensured we enjoyed every aspect of the meal.

What makes this special is that this happened over 3000 Kilometres away from Kerala.

Making this event a success needed identifying caterers who can cook and deliver specific cuisine, ensuring that it is delivered on time, gaining permission from local authorities to make this happen, and ensuring that there is no glitch. It also meant getting a group of people together and participate. It required all the ‘kids’ (as I lovingly address them) to serve the food to their friends, faculty, and staff. It required them to manage the logistics as well as handle the ‘on the floor’ challenges of ensuring every one had a good meal.

I was astonished at their energy levels, their commitment levels, their interest levels, their enthusiasm levels, and much more.

It did not seem that this required creation of a team or committee.

It did not seem to require any role identification and delegation.

It did not seem to require any oversight.

How did all this happen meticulously in a seemingly leaderless group? I came away feeling thrilled and proud that – here are a group of enterprising students who gave me the opportunity to be their teacher. I learn so much from them. I always tell them this. Here is one more opportunity to learn and thank them.

Teachers must really think over this. When students ‘love’ what they do, they don’t need to be given instructions, they don’t need to be grouped, they don’t need supervision. All they need is direction. If students are not enthused over your classes and assignments, don’t blame the ‘kids’, ask yourself how you can create a more inspiring opportunity for them to display their levels of passion, interest, energy and potential. How can we make students ‘love’ the subject and the learning? The rest will be taken care of, by them!

I reiterate my stand that students have a lot to teach their teachers. I hope the teachers have the openness to learn from them. If teachers open their eyes, there is so much to gain from the interaction with our younger generation.

Thanks Guys and Gals, for a lovely ‘Onam Sadya’ and even more wonderful lessons to become a better teacher. I promise to learn and try!

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